Runboard.com
You're welcome.
Community logo






runboard.com       Sign up (learn about it) | Sign in (lost password?)

 
rorancio Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 02-2010
Posts: 2
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
wanting to get into the sport but buying the equipment is over my head... PLEASE HeLP!!!! Lol


Hello, can anyone help?
I am 6 2 210lbs... what kind of kite should I buy for kitesurfing the kingston area?


(been going through sites and every site it says it all depends on your area (wind conditions) and weight. and no sites say you should buy this kite if your X amount of weight yada yada...)
2/4/2010, 7:09 pm Link to this post Send Email to rorancio   Send PM to rorancio
 
rorancio Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 02-2010
Posts: 2
Karma: 0 (+0/-0)
Reply | Quote
Re: wanting to get into the sport but buying the equipment is over my head... PLEASE HeLP!!!! Lol


except Kiteboarding kingston. it says to buy a 12m 14m sle combo for a heavier person but i m looking to buy just one for this summer.
2/4/2010, 7:34 pm Link to this post Send Email to rorancio   Send PM to rorancio
 
brent4336 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Registered user

Registered: 06-2007
Posts: 378
Karma: 0 (+1/-1)
Reply | Quote
Re: wanting to get into the sport but buying the equipment is over my head... PLEASE HeLP!!!! Lol


Its a tough call when learning cause the reality is, its both harder and more dangerous to learn on bigger kites, but once you have some skills, that kite is the one you end up using the most.

In the beginning of time when the first few generations of guys around here started messing around with kites, we started small. Time was spent on trainers, and then we pretty much all bit the bullet and bought a first kite. No one had to tell us to start small. Once we learned the ropes and got comfortable with that kite on land and snow we began to feel the need for more power and soon enough the addiction took hold.

Today people want to go directly to the ripping around stage from the get go and I'm not sure that makes for a safe or sustainable sport in these parts. It's kind of unrealistic to think that you can just buy one kite and safely become a ripper. Kind of like buying a 1000 cc crotch rocket before youre any good at riding a bicycle.

If you really get into this sport you cant really get by without at least three kites. There is no such thing as one kite that covers it all. Yes, I use my big one more often that the other two combined, but I would have never started out with that as my only kite. I pretty much divide em up into small med and large, the sizes of which vary for different size riders. At your weight lets say 6-7, 11-12, 14-16. Weekend warriors can get by pretty well with two kites: a smaller medium and a Large. Say a 9-10 and a 14-16 but you gotta know your limits and take a pass when you see guys out on 6's.

You should be looking at the smaller kites first, and here's why. You need to learn the ropes in enough wind to make it work, but not so much that you are gonna die... At first that range is pretty small, say 12-18 mph (10-15 knots, 18-25 km/h). That is nice easy light to med wind where you can safely learn to rig, launch, control, ditch, relaunch and generate power with your kite. Any less and the kite will be unreactive, fall from the sky and you spend most your time struggling to get it off the ground (time well spend in the begining). Any more and your a danger to yourself your kite and others... but most importantly... our public access!

Big kites are slow and powerful and if you try to learn on them in light wind conditions it will take you much longer with more dammage to your gear and probably you. Any kite school out there starts you on smaller faster kites to teach you the skill set, then steps you up as your ready.

I can only speak for myself, but when I see someone going through the propper steps and trying to learn in the right conditions with the right size gear I'm keen to help out and be encouraging. When I see guys trying to go straight to riding with big kites or in too much wind, I'm pretty quick to shut them down. Kingston is no place to screw up publicly as our prescious waterfront access can too easily be taken away. We have but one downtown launch, and its not in the least beginner friendly. If your really gonna do this sport, take the time to learn it right and know what your doing by the time you show up at a dificult launch site. Around here you gotta start with a smaller kite, on land somewhere wide open far from tree lines, power lines, breakwalls, roads, fences, traffic, and the public (all of which are one mess up away at our local summer launch). Trust me. In the begining there are plenty of mess ups, so give yourself room. Now that we have ice, and hopefully someday soon snow, you have the oportune learning ground right out there. Hope to see you out there.

P.S. Wear a helmet. Ice is hard.
2/5/2010, 11:43 am Link to this post Send Email to brent4336   Send PM to brent4336
 


Add a reply





You are not logged in (login)